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Challenges and Metrics in Digital Engineering

July 2022 Podcast
William Richard Nichols

Bill Nichols and Suzanne Miller discuss the challenges in making the transition from traditional development practices to digital engineering.

“There are multiple levels of doing this sort of engineering. You have to deal with things like the requirements, the architectural level design, code generation, and actual code instantiations. For each of these levels, you have to have a model that is reviewable and has some sort of authority. You want a single source, and the models have to be consistent with each other.”

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Abstract

Digital engineering uses digital tools and representations in the process of developing, sustaining, and maintaining systems, including requirements, design, analysis, implementation, and test. The digital modeling approach is intended to establish an authoritative source of truth for the system, in which discipline-specific views of the system are created using the same model elements. In this SEI Podcast, William “Bill” Nichols, a senior member of the technical staff with the SEI’s Software Solutions Division, discusses with principal researcher Suzanne Miller the challenges in making the transition from traditional development practices to digital engineering.

About the Speaker

William Richard Nichols

William Richard Nichols

William "Bill" Nichols joined the SEI in 2006 as a senior member of the technical staff and served as a Personal Software Process (PSP) instructor and Team Software Process (TSP) coach. Before ...

William "Bill" Nichols joined the SEI in 2006 as a senior member of the technical staff and served as a Personal Software Process (PSP) instructor and Team Software Process (TSP) coach. Before joining the SEI, Nichols led a software-development team at the Bettis Laboratory near Pittsburgh, where he had been developing and maintaining nuclear engineering and scientific software for 14 years. Nichols has a doctorate in physics from Carnegie Mellon University.

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