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Required Elements for Constructing a Highly Adoptable and Adaptive Digital Forensic Model

August 2020 Presentation
Ken Rodgers (K-Rod Technology)

The study consisted of elemental theme generation using a United States sample population of 20 experts in the field of digital forensics from private and public sectors.

Publisher:

K-Rod Technology

Subjects

Abstract

Research indicated a lack of a widely-accepted digital forensic model. This qualitative modified Delphi study identifies the acceptable digital forensic model elements required to create a widely-accepted digital forensic model with a high degree of usefulness, a low degree of difficulty, and the capability of organizational acclimation through adaptation. The study consisted of elemental theme generation using a United States sample population of 20 experts in the field of digital forensics from private and public sectors. Participants have all been through a certification process, have more than five years' experience, and considered forensic experts by U.S. courts. Participants evaluated the researched potential of forensic model elements from formerly suggested models and best practices in addition to the open-ended questions they answered. The analysis of the captured participant data involved the use of ATLAS. Qualitative Data Analysis Software and the use of Apache OpenOffice. The Delphi method provided six themes centered on the required elements of an adoptable and adaptive digital forensic model. Participant responses confirmed the literature review data, indicating there is no standard forensic model. Only six participants indicated that they use a forensic model of some type. The identified elemental themes provide a foundation for future research into establishing a digital forensic model that would be widely accepted and have a high degree of usefulness, a low degree of difficulty, and the capability of organizational acclimation through adaptation.