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Principles of CASE Tool Integration

Principles of CASE Tool Integration

Abstract

Principles of CASE Tool Integration describes a set of concepts, models, and guidelines for understanding CASE (computer-aided         software engineering) tool integration and provides in-depth analysis  of the CASE tool integration problem. Individual CASE tools typically   support a small set of tasks within a software development process. They do not provide coordinated support across a full range of life-cycle tasks.

Principles of CASE Tool Integration was created to assist those         organizations that are are struggling to coordinate the use of collections of tools and, as a result, are not taking full advantage of CASE technology. The book provides insights on how to select tools that can work together, provides a way to understand different technologies and strategies for CASE tool integration, and offers practical advice on how to use current integration technologies effectively. The book contains lessons learned from SEI experiments with CASE tool integration, as well as lessons learned from industrial organizations that have tried to integrate CASE tools.  After reading Principles of CASE Tool Integration, software managers  and engineers will be able to use the book as a guide to help with defining and evolving a realistic CASE tool integration strategy. They will be able to express their own CASE tool integration approach in a way that reveals strengths and weaknesses and avoid fundamental traps and potholes that many other CASE tool integrators have endured.      

Principles of Case Tool Integration is divided into four parts:      

  1. The Problem of Integration in a CASE Environment        
  2. Service, Mechanism, and Process Level Integration        
  3. Practical Experiences with CASE Integration        
  4. A Review of the Current State of CASE Tool Integration      

Format: Hardback

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Published by Oxford University Press

Available at Oxford University Press »