Software Engineering Institute | Carnegie Mellon University
Software Engineering Institute | Carnegie Mellon University

Digital Library

Javascript is currently disabled for your browser. For an optimal search experience, please enable javascript.

Advanced Search

Basic Search

Content Type

Topics

Publication Date

Presentation

Neglected Aspects of Software Architecture (SATURN 2007)

  • May 2007
  • By G. Todd Kaiser (Raytheon Intelligence and Information Systems)
  • This presentation discusses how certain aspects (e.g. schedules, budgets, team agreements, and workshare) can (and should) affect software architectures and why the “best” architecture from a technology standpoint is not always the “optimum” architecture.
  • Publisher: Software Engineering Institute
  • This presentation was created for a conference series or symposium and does not necessarily reflect the positions and views of the Software Engineering Institute.
  • Abstract

    In our zest to tackle the hardest problems in the software industry, software architects apply the latest techniques, processes, tools, and technology to create the best software architecture for the systems they are working on. We apply service-oriented approaches, we claim that the architecture is going to be developed using agile methods, and we use architectural documentation to communicate our brilliant ideas. Our architectures rigorously examine the structure, data, and behavior of the software that we are going to build. We examine the quality attributes of performance, reliability, and so forth. For all the work we do to ensure the best architecture that we can devise, we often doom our architectures to failure because we neglect the aspects of the architecture that end up being the most important. Schedules, budgets, team agreements, workshare, and so forth, are very important aspects that affect and are affected by our architectures. This presentation will discuss how these aspects can (and should) affect software architectures and why the "best" architecture from a technology standpoint is not always the "optimum" architecture.

  • Download